Friday, October 2, 2009

Weekend arts picks: Oct. 2-6

A photo of New York City by Andreas Feininger.

Art: Opening Saturday at the Norton Museum of Art is New York, New York: The 20th Century, an exhibition from the West Palm Beach museum’s collection of New York scenes, depicted in paintings, photographs, sculptures and works on paper. Among those artists represented are painters Stuart Davis, Edward Hopper and Reginald Marsh, and photographers Bernice Abbott, Diane Arbus and Andreas Feininger. The show runs through Dec. 27. Also, next week's monthly Norton After Dark event is called Halloween Chill, and showing up Thursday night for the 5 p.m.-to-9 p.m. event gets you $1 off admission, which is normally $8 for adults, $3 for ages 13 to 21, and free for ages 12 and under. Visit www.norton.org for more information.

Torcello (1914), by Margaret Jordan Patterson.

[This entry has been updated to correct a factual error in the caption.] Next week, the Flagler Museum on Palm Beach opens its new exhibit, an examination of the American Arts and Crafts movement called A Spirit of Simplicity: American Arts and Crafts from the Two Red Roses Foundation. The Arts and Crafts movement began in the late 1800s and continued into the first decades of the 20th century. Handmade, well-crafted objects, such as furniture, woodblock prints, pottery, stained glass and metalwork, will be on display through Jan. 3. The Flagler Museum is open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, and noon until 5:00 p.m., Sunday. Admission is $18 for adults, $10 for youth ages 13-18, $3 for children ages 6-12, and children under six are free. For more information, call the Flagler Museum at (561) 655-2833 or visit www.flaglermuseum.us. --K. Deits

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525-1594).

Music: Devotees of Seraphic Fire concerts always ask him, Patrick Dupre Quigley says, when the group is going to do some music by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, the great 16th-century Italian master of sacred music. Those Renaissance polyphony fans are getting their wish this weekend, as the Miami concert choir presents four concerts featuring the Missa Papae Marcelli, perhaps Palestrina’s supreme mass setting. Also on the program: Gregorio Allegri’s Miserere, and works by Josquin, Constanzo Festa and Dufay. The series, which began Thursday in Key Biscayne, continues at 7:30 p.m. today at First United Methodist in Coral Gables; 8 p.m. Saturday at All Saints Episcopal in Fort Lauderdale, and 4 p.m. Sunday at Miami Beach Community Church in Miami Beach. Tickets: $35. Call 305-285-9060 or visit www.seraphicfire.org.

Luis Magalhães and Nina Schumann, duo-pianists.

At Lynn University on Saturday night, the South Africa-based piano duo of Nina Schumann and Luis Magalhães plays classics of the literature including the Second Suite of Rachmaninov (Op. 17), the Paganini Variations of Brahms (Op. 35) and Poland’s Witold Lutoslawski, the Second Suite of the 19th-century Russian composer Anton Arensky, and an arrangement of the Aaron Copland tourist tone poem El Salon Mexico. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, Lynn University, Boca Raton. Tickets: $20; call 237-9000 or visit www.lynn.edu/tickets.

Pianist Christopher Atzinger.

[This entry has been updated to reflect a program change.] On Sunday at the Steinway Gallery in Boca Raton, the American pianist Christopher Atzinger, who teaches at Minnesota’s St. Olaf College, performs the Sonata No. 28 in A, Op. 101 of Beethoven, one of the master's final five sonatas. Also on the program is another collection of late music, the Op. 116 Fantasies of Johannes Brahms. 5 p.m. Tickets: $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Call 929-6633 or visit www.pianolovers.org.

Also Sunday afternoon, the Delray Baroque mini-festival continues with harpsichordist Keith Paulson-Thorp in a program he calls Music for an English Harpsichord. Much of Paulson-Thorp’s program is Baroque -- Handel’s The Harmonious Blacksmith, a suite by C.P.E. Bach and a sonata by Pietro Paradies -- but there are also later works, such as a sonata by Haydn (No. 13 in G, H.XVI/6), a sonatina by Ferruccio Busoni, excerpts from Sir Herbert Howells’ Lambert’s Clavichord, and Tango for Tim, a piece by the contemporary British film composer Michael Nyman. 4 p.m, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Delray Beach. Tickets: $15-$18, $5 for students. Call 278-6003 or visit www.stpaulsdelray.org.

Pianist Tian Ying.

The University of Miami launches its 26th annual Festival Miami tonight, a monthlong celebration that includes big events in jazz, pop and classical music, including a tribute to the late film composer Henry Mancini, whose institute has moved to UM. Friday night’s concert features UM’s Frost Symphony Orchestra in music by Schumann (Scenes From Goethe’s Faust) and Brahms (Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68). The fine pianist Tian Ying solos in the Fifth Piano Concerto (in E-flat, Op. 73, Emperor) of Beethoven; Zoe Zeniodi conducts. 8 p.m. Gusman Hall, Coral Gables. Tickets: $25-$75. Call 305-284-4940 or visit www.festivalmiami.com.

Pianist Claire Huangci.

Gearing up for the 200th birth anniversary next year of its guiding spirit, Miami’s Chopin Foundation presents the first two concerts in its season, featuring the young American pianist Claire Huangci, a native of Rochester, N.Y., who has just completed her studies at the prestigious Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. Huangci will play a piece by J.S. Bach (Partita in C minor, BWV 831) and the quirky Beethoven trifle known as Rage Over a Lost Penny, but the rest of her program is Chopin: The Third Sonata (in B minor, Op. 58), the great Polonaise-Fantaisie (Op. 61), the popular Polonaise in A-flat (Op. 53, Heroic), the Berceuse (in D-flat, Op. 57), and two etudes (Op. 10, No. 2, in A minor, and Op. 25, No. 6, in G-sharp minor). Admission is free; 7 p.m. Saturday, Broward County Main Library in Fort Lauderdale, and 3 p.m. at the Granada Presbyterian Church in Coral Gables. For more information, call 305-858-0624 or visit www.chopin.org.

Finally, there is Paula Cole, the singer-songwriter best known for Where Have All the Cowboys Gone? and I Don't Want to Wait, the theme song for the TV series Dawson's Creek. Cole is in the middle of a national tour that brings her confessional brand of pop to Fort Lauderdale's Broward Center on Saturday night. Tickets: $35; for more information, call 954-462-0222 or visit www.browardcenter.org. -- G. Stepanich

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