Thursday, July 2, 2009

Weekend arts picks: July 2-5

Trees in Howard Park, by Bill Perry.

Art: If you’re up for some laid-back fun while viewing (and perhaps buying) art at the same time, the weekly Thursday night art show at the Rum Bar next to Panama Hattie's in North Palm Beach is the latest, hottest hangout for the artsy crowd.

About a dozen artists show their work, and tonight, well-known local artist and Armory Art Center teacher Bill Perry will have his drawings and color photographs on hand. Liz Bush, a native of England now transplanted to West Palm Beach, will be featuring her color photographs of nature, and West Palm's Daniel Millay has color and black-and-white photographs ranging from flowers to portraits of greyhounds. The Rum Bar is located on the Intracoastal Waterway at 11511 Ellison Wilson Road in North Palm Beach just south of Panama Hattie's. For more information about Bill Perry, call (561) 853-5748; for Panama Hattie's, call (561) 627-1545, or visit the restaurant's Website. -- K. Deits

A sculpture by Patricia Peters.

On Friday, the ClayGlassMetalStone Cooperative Gallery in Lake Worth shows the work of 21 local artists who work in three-dimensional forms. The opening, set for 6-9 p.m. Friday, will feature Marcia DiSylvester, Debra Gower and Patricia Peters.

A teapot by Marcia DiSylvester.

DiSylvester, a resident of Delray Beach, creates highly collectible teapots in porcelain, stoneware and low-fire clays. “I find inspiration in nature, prehistoric pottery and early Greek, Asian, Scandinavian and Native American cultures," she said.

Peters, also from Delray, presents sculptures that reflect the joyous side of nature and humans. She has fashioned works in clay, concrete and cast bronze; in the near future she will present a series of Rubenesque dancers in bronze positioned on spinning pedestals.

A stained-glass work by Debra Gower.

Stained-glass lamps and framed pieces are the specialty of Lake Worth artist Debra Gower. She draws on decades of experience in graphic design to create her art. “My fine-arts skills mirror that of my commercial work, creating dynamic airbrush and colored pencil drawings and paintings that place a twist on reality,” Gower says. “On my functional side is the custom stained-glass, created to adorn a home, office or commercial space.”

The ClayGlassMetalStone Cooperative Gallery is sponsored by the Flamingo Clay Studio, a nonprofit arts organization whose mission is to provide affordable studio and gallery space for artists who work in 3D. The gallery is located at 605 Lake Ave. in downtown Lake Worth. Hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Gallery openings are the first and third Fridays of each month. For information, call (561) 588-8344 or visit www.Clayglassmetalstone.com. -- K. Deits

The Spirit of '76 (1876), by Archibald Willard.

Music: The upcoming Independence Day celebration always brings out big bursts of American music, which always leaves me wondering why all-American programs aren't routinely planned on other days. But here are three chances to appreciate the wealth and variety of the music made right here in the United States:

Roberta Rust: Tomorrow night at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Lake Worth, the Lynn University pedagogue and pianist presents a free concert of American music. On the program are works by Gershwin, Joplin and John Cage, along with pieces by Jerome Kern and Erroll Garner. A reception follows the 7 p.m. concert, and more information can be had by calling 561-582-6609 or writing to SAEpiscopal@aol.com.

I hear America singing, in Delray: Two patriotic concerts are scheduled an hour apart at two Delray Beach churches in Sunday afternoon, beginning with a program of patriotic and popular song presented by soprano Alicia Branch, baritone William Stafford and pianist Mark Galsky at the St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic Church Family Life Center on George Bush Boulevard. Galsky is the church's organist as well as the host of a morning radio program on WXEL (90.7 FM). Tickets for the 3 p.m. concert are $20, which includes wine and snacks. For more information, call 276-6892, ext. 1029.

Charles Ives (1874-1954).

And at St. Paul's Episcopal on Swinton Avenue, Keith Paulson-Thorp has planned a wide-ranging program that includes music by American composers Arthur Foote, Charles Tomlinson Griffes (Poem for flute, played by Robert Billington), and Charles Ives (Variations on 'America'), along with piano rags by Charles Johnson and Robert Hampton, a waltz by Allen Blank, John Philip Sousa's The Stars and Stripes Forever, and four spirituals (including Deep River), sung by Ed Pierson. Paulson-Thorp also will play Variations on 'Home Sweet Home' by the 19th-century German-American organist John Zundel. Tickets for the 4 p.m. concert are $15 and $18. Call 278-6003 for more information or visit www.stpaulsdelray.org. -- G. Stepanich

Theater: This Friday, Company, the Tony Award-winning 1970 Stephen Sondheim-George Furth musical on New York relationships and marriages, joins Twelfth Night in this summer’s Festival Rep at Florida Atlantic University. Featured are Bruce Linser as bachelor Bobby and Laura Hodos as sardonic Joanne, whose 11 o’clock number, The Ladies Who Lunch, is one of the score’s showstoppers. For ticket information, call (561) 297-3810. -- H. Erstein

Breno Mello as Orpheus in Black Orpheus (1959).

Film: Lake Park’s Mos’Art Theatre adds film classics to its programming menu this week with Marcel Camus’ Black Orpheus (1959), the Oscar-winning foreign-language film which sets the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice against the musical turmoil of Carnival time in Rio de Janeiro. The advent of DVDs have made most theatrical exhibition of classic movies scarce, so fans of this 50-year-old masterpiece -- and those who have never seen it -- have a rare opportunity to experience this striking tale as if should be seen. For directions, call (561) 337-6763.

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